Victoria Film Fest Review: ‘The Reason I Jump’ examines the world from the perspective of those with autism

The Reason I Jump

It has been 14 years since Higashida Naoki’s book, The Reason I Jump was first published in Japan, and 8 since English novelist David Mitchell translated it. Naoki was 13 at the time and is autistic and unable to communicate verbally. He was able to write his book by using an alphabet board his mother created, and in the process provided a roadmap for how his mind works and how he experiences the world.

That roadmap has proven invaluable to the families of those on the spectrum, especially those who are non-verbal. This documentary by Jerry Rothwell explores how that roadmap has impacted the lives of five such people. The result is a film that will open your eyes and your heart.

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Victoria Film Fest Review: ‘Once Upon a Time in Venezuela’ is a heartbreaking look at a country in crisis

Once Upon a Time in Venezuela

Imagine living in a place that is literally rotting away beneath you. No matter what you do, what help you ask for from local and national governments, your home slowly but surely disappears. This is the story of Congo Mirador, a tiny village of fewer than 1000 people situated on Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela. It’s also the story of the whole country, and it’s heartbreaking.

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Review: ‘A Perfect Planet’ Episode 5: ‘Humans’ brings the whole series together

A Perfect Planet Episode 5: Humans

And so here we are at the end of this series. In previous weeks the series examined the four major systems of our world: Volcanoes, which seed the atmosphere and create the land, The sun, which supplies us with energy, Weather, which delivers water to all life, and Oceans, which carry nutrients to all corners of the world. This last week the series examines a new force exerting an influence on the world: us.

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Review: ‘A Perfect Planet’ Episode 3: ‘Weather’ is what lets life thrive, at least until we change it

This week A Perfect Planet takes a look at the weather, and how its predictability is part of hat lets life thrive on earth.

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Review: ‘A Perfect Planet’ Episode 2: ‘The Sun’ looks at how energy arrives on, and powers, life on the planet

Last week on A Perfect Planet the series looked at volcanoes and their extraordinary influence on this planet’s biosphere. This week, they look at a more obvious element in how the world functions: the sun.

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Review: ‘A Perfect Planet’ Episode 1: ‘Volcano’ is the start to another amazingly photographed, drama-filled BBC nature documentary

A Perfect Planet: Volcano

We live on an amazing planet. We often look to science fiction and fantasy stories for a sense of wonder, but the truth is that all you have to do is look closely at this world to accomplish that. Whether it’s half a million flamingos nesting in the middle of a caustic lake, or river otters fishing in volcanically warmed waters, Earth is a miraculous place.

The BBC Natural History Unit has produced incredible nature documentaries for decades now. In particular, they captured the world’s imagination with a series of programs starting with Planet Earth back in 2006. A Perfect Planet is the latest of these series, once again narrated by David Attenborough, and once again stunningly photographed.

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Review: Jodorowsky’s Dune

Jodorowsky's Dune

As a portrait of an artist, Frank Pavich’s film of the visionary auteur Alejandro Jodorosky’s efforts to create a 10 hour film adaptation of “Dune” is fascinating, entertaining and endearing. The 85-year old Jodorosky comes across as an enthusiastic guru, an almost cultish figure who crosses the world discovering fellow artists and dragging them into a mad campaign to create generation-changing works of art. The filmmaker behind “El Topo”, “The Holy Mountain” and “Santa Sangre”, Jodorosky was already a cause célèbre of cult film when, for reasons not really revealed, he managed to acquire the rights to Frank Herbert’s scifi epic “Dune”, at the time a huge bestseller, and determined, without actually having read the book itself, to recreate the story as a movie that would change the minds of young people forever.

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Documentary I’m Officially Looking Forward To: Deceptive Practices: The Mysteries and Mentors of Ricky Jay

Ricky Jay

I don’t remember how old I was. I was already a fan of magic and illusion, although I never pursued it as a hobby. I was surfing channels on the 10 foot satellite dish we had when I was a kid and I stumbled across a show called “Ricky Jay and his 52 Assistants”. From that point on, through his appearances in film and television I have been a fan of Ricky Jay. The man has a sense of quiet theatricality and an immese pool of knowledge and skill, and he handles a deck of cards so well that if given the chance to play with him I’d never let him shuffle.

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