Review: ‘Hell Hath No Fury’ is a Fun, Nasty, Scrappy B-Movie

Hell Hath No Fury

You know the rest of the saying. The wrath of a wronged woman is a fabled thing, and in this film, Nina Bergman’s Marie is betrayed by just about everyone she has ever met. The lover of a nazi officer, betrayed by the resistance, branded as a collaborator by the townspeople, and rescued by a group of US soldiers who are only interested in the cache of nazi gold, she happens to know the location of. So yes, she’s royally pissed.

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Home Video: All the Spider-Man Movies and where to Buy, Rent, or Stream them

Spider-Man No Way Home

Spider-Man: No Way Home is hitting theatres this week. This will be Peter Parker’s sixth appearance in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, but it’s also the 9th stand-alone Spider-Man movie since Sam Raimi’s Spider-Man debuted in 2002. Now seems like a perfect time to catch up with your favourite web-head, so here’s where you can buy, rent, or stream all the stand-alone Spider-Man movies.

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Review: ‘The Boathouse’ cribs from some classics to create an atmospheric horror story

The Boathouse

There’s a scene in the middle of The Boathouse in which the characters discuss a case of plagiarism over dinner. One character, a professor, tells the story of a student who copied a work by Joyce and then feigned ignorance. “If you’re going to steal,” he says, “maybe steal from someone more obscure.” This leads into an entire discussion of theft vs influence and how all of that shapes art and literature.

It’s a startlingly relevant scene as well because The Boathouse either –depending on your point of view– borrows from or is influenced very heavily by some classics, most notably the work of Henry James and Alfred Hitchcock. Do you know why these influences are classics, though? Because they’re good.

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Review: ‘The Witcher Season 2’ is a cool, confident continuation and improvement of the story that began in season one

The Witcher

Let me begin this by saying that I enjoyed the first season of The Witcher. Some were put off by the multiple timelines and Geralt’s absence from some of the stories, but I was not one of them. If you were, you will be happy to know that the entire second season takes place in a single timeframe and that Geralt’s story is the main plot of every episode. On the other hand, if you were like me, well, you already like the show, and you’ll continue enjoying it because it’s good.

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Review: ‘West Side Story’ reinvents a classic with modern context

West Side Story

Steven Spielberg is about to turn 75 years old. Since his debut feature in 1971, a full fifty years ago, he has tackled all manner of genre and subject matter, but never a musical. It makes sense then that his trademark skills –an iconic eye for composition and blocking, perfectly deployed single takes, finding the best cast for the story, and impeccable detail at every level– now all feel like he might have been refining specifically to make a musical because his new version of West Side Story makes excellent use of all of them.

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Awesome Friday Games Podcast: ‘Marvel’s Guardians Of The Galaxy’ & ‘Call Of Duty: Modern Warfare 2’

Podcast Guardians of the Galaxy & Modern Warfare 2

Hello there, and the warmest of welcomes to this week’s Awesome Friday Games Podcast!

This week Simon takes a dive into why ‘Marvel’s Guardians Of The Galaxy’ makes such a strong case for game of the year, and also looks into the endless thrills of the Spec OPs missions in ‘Call Of Duty: Modern Warfare 2’.

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WFF ’21 Quick Review: ‘We’re All In This Together’ is a quirky family drama

We're All In This Together

Of all the most reliable subjects for drama, family is the most reliable. After all, unlike friends or coworkers, you don’t get to choose family, and that extra level of tether adds stakes to any situation. We’re All In This Together is a good example of this fact, bringing together a pair of estranged twins, an underaged sister in a relationship with an older man, and a mother who went over a waterfall in a barrel. Literally, not figuratively.

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WFF ’21 Quick Review: ‘Moon Manor’ is a lovely story about a man going out on his own terms

Moon Manor

Moon Manor feels like a film that is destined to be divisive. It follows an older man who has learned he has Alzheimer’s, and rather than waiting for it to erase him slowly, he throws a big party –a FUN-eral– to make sure he connects with the important people in his life before committing suicide.

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WFF ’21 Review: ‘Drinkwater’ is a quirky, Canadian, familiar coming of age film

Drinkwater

Stop me if you’ve heard this one before: a teenager is hopelessly in love with a beautiful girl and signs up for some kind of feat to impress her. He trains for this event and trains some more. At least once, he loses faith, but along the way, he grows up a little, turns his bully into a friend, and in the end, gets with the girl who has been his friend the whole time.

If any of this sounds familiar, then Drinkwater won’t have that many surprises in store for you, at least when it comes to the plot. But, on the other hand, it has a good central performance, an incredibly Canadian take on the materials, and a delightful supporting performance from Eric McCormack.

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Review: ‘The Power of the Dog’ features a powerhouse performance from Benedict Cumberbatch

THE POWER OF THE DOG

It’s fair to say that Benedict Cumberbatch is perhaps a little over-exposed. Since his big break with Sherlock in 2010, he has appeared in all manner of films, not only in prestige dramas like Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy and The Imitation Game, but also in major franchises like Star Trek, The Hobbit, and the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Despite their varied nature and differing challenges, it feels like all of these roles have blinded us to the simple fact that he is actually an outstanding actor. Not to say that he hasn’t done good work in the past ten years, but rather that we’ve forgotten exactly how good he can be.

Jane Campion is here to remind us of this and that she is one of the best directors working today.

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