Podcast: Turning Red, Fresh, & After Yang

Turning Red, Fresh, After Yang

Greetings programs! We’re a day late in posting this episode of the podcast, but to make up for it, we’re talking about three, yes three, excellent movies for you to watch. First up is Pixar’s Turning Red, their first feature set in Canada and another surefire hit for Disney+. Second, we’re talking about the Disney+/Hulu original Fresh, a romantic thriller that goes to some very unexpected places. Last but far from least, we’re talking about the sophomore film from Kogonada, After Yang, a quiet and touching film about what it means to be alive.

There are streaming links as well as our ratings after the jump. Join us!

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With ‘Fresh’, Mimi Cave Emerges As Horror’s Most Exciting New Director

When I tell you that you’re not ready for ‘Fresh‘, I don’t just mean the moment it pulls back its curtains to reveal its true nature leaving you wide-eyed and breathless. I also don’t mean the last 30 minutes, where I though my heart might actually escape through my mouth and run out of the room. It’s the moments where director Mimi Cave slams us out of our genre comfort zone, throwing our expectations on their heads, and confronting us directly through the eyes of her cast smashing through the fourth wall. The absolute dread she induces by just having a steady hand on the edits. The sheer desperation she squeezes out of every moment.

The meatball.

By the time you see the credits, one thing is incredibly clear: Mimi Cave is the freshest (sorry) new horror director in town.

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Podcast: ‘The Book of Boba Fett’ & ‘Pam & Tommy’

The Book of Boba Fett / Pam & Tommy

Greetings programs! This week on the Awesome Friday Podcast, we talk about two new series, both from Disney. First up is The Book of Boba Fett, which has aired five episodes and is struggling to figure out precisely what it wants to be. Next, Pam & Tommy, the upcoming miniseries starring Lily James, Sebastian Stan, and Seth Rogen, depicts a specific moment in 90s pop culture with staggering accuracy and honestly. 

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Review: ‘The Falcon and the Winter Soldier’ premiere is a big tease for things to come

How do you follow in the footsteps of a giant? How do you live with the sins of your past? These are two of the questions at the heart of The Falcon and the Winter Soldier, the new series on Disney+ that follows Anthony Mackie and Sebastian Stan, reprising their roles as Sam Wilson and Bucky Barnes, respectively.

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‘The 355’ trailer: five badass women, one world to save

A stellar cast of amazing actors? Check. A plot to destroy the world? Check. An American agent forming a deniable team of badasses to take on the threat? Check. Each badass has a distinct speciality? Check. Said American agent having a badass nickname? Check.

The 355 hits all the checkboxes that an action movie should but with one difference: the team is all women. I, for one, think this looks awesome. It looks dumb as a bag of hammers and exactly up my alley. Let’s take a look.

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Review: ‘The Devil All The Time’ is a bleak story anchored by great performances

Tom Holland / The Devil All The Time

There are a lot of no good sons of bitches out there. This is the message that Willard Russell (Bill Skarsgård) imparts to his son immediately after brutally beating two men who had made lewd comments about his wife.

Willard teaches his young son Arvin (Michael Banks Repeta) that the world is full of no good sons of bitches, and that using violence against them is not so much a question of if as it is when. Years later, an adult Arvin (Tom Holland) finds himself surrounded by no-good sons of bitches; he remembers his father’s lessons.

The Devil All The Time is a story of generational pain and violence in 1950s Ohio. It is bleak, and unflinching, and also incredibly uneven. If it weren’t anchored by two brilliant performances I’m not sure that I would recommend it. Luckily, it is, so I am.

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