Home Video: Five Great Horror Films and Where to Buy, Rent, or Stream Them

Halloween is coming, and that means it’s time to start watching some horror movies! Last week we looked at the Halloween franchise; this week, we’re looking at a half dozen gems that I love.

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Ravenous (1999)

Guy Pearce plays a military captain posted to a remote fort on the frontier where he hears a tale of a gruesome series of murders and investigates. Cannibalism ensues.

Your mileage may vary on this one, but this western horror is one of those movies with two great central performances from Pearce and Robert Carlyle, Jeffery Jones, Neal McDonough, Jeremy Davies, and David Arquette in support that, if it is on, I will watch it.


The House of the Devil (2009)

Made in 2009, but set during the “satanic panic” of the 1980s and made in the style of a classic 80s slasher, House of the Devil isn’t entirely scary, but it’s so well made and is such a great homage to the horror films of the 1980s that I ended up loving it.


Under the Shadow (2016)

Set during the Iran-Iraq War, a single mother must contend with a malevolent force after a missile strikes her building but does not explode. Visually inventive and filled with dread, this Iranian import serves up some good scares on a modest budget.


Green Room (2016)

A punk rock band takes a last-minute gig at a bar in the middle of nowhere that turns out to be a hangout for neo-nazis. After witnessing a murder, they end up trapped in the green room, surrounded by men who want to kill them. This one is certain to get under your skin, featuring a villainous turn from Patrick Stewart and one of Anton Yelchin’s final performances.


Anything for Jackson

Anything for Jackson (2020)

A pair of grandparents, desperate to bring back their recently deceased grandson from the dead, turn to satan worship and black magic, and unleash more than they bargained for. Canadian legends Sheila McCarthy and Julian Richings play the grandparents, and the production team does some great work with limited funds. This Canadian production was one of my favourites from last year.


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